COLLIE ILLUSTRATIONS

Compiled by
Helen C. Cramer
Lecture
1994
Judges Training Scheme
Collie Club Of NSW
Illustrations by
Lorraine B. Still
Collie Club Of America 1961
IDEAL MALE showing white markings
IDEAL FEMALE with white markings
IDEAL MALE without full white markings IDEAL FEMALE with broken collar
Ideal Head
HEAD FAULTS
Profile view
ROMAN NOSE & UNDERSHOT JAW
TWO ANGLED HEAD
1-2. Shows a pronounced arch of muzzle rather than the desired straight line.
3. Jutting out of lower jaw, produced by the lower incisors protruding beyond lower lip, commonly accompanies a 'Roman Nose.'
1-2.  Skull & muzzle form two lines at angles to one another instead of being approximately parallel. Also produces a 'deep through' the cheek effect. (3)
BORZOI TYPE OR FOREIGN HEAD HIGH OVER & BETWEEN THE EYES
1-2. The relation of skull to muzzle forms a curving effect throughout. Foreign to true Collie type.
3. Foreface too long in relation to skull   
A 'lump' above and between the eyes (1-2) gives an 'alligator' like appearance to the head. Spoils the expression as well as the planes of profile.
WAVY PROFILE
DISH FACE
Presents a wavy appearance rather than the desired straight line of skull, slight drop at 'stop', than straight line of muzzle. Caused mostly by 'long stop' (2), and a 'drop off' at the end of the muzzle (3) Here the muzzle presents a scooped or 'dished' effect (1-2) rather than the desired straight line.
DROP Off
SHARK JAW
Here a lack of chin (2) gives a weak 'shark jawed' effect to this head. Bite may be correct and fault lie in absence of chin, or it may accompany an over - shot bite.
A very acceptable head except for 'drop off' at the end of the muzzle (1)
SLACK JAW
FARM SHEPHARD TYPE
Here the lower jaw gives a slack and hanging effect (1). In the correct jaw line the lower lip should fit tightly over the teeth and meet the upper lip. The 'slack lipped' appearance often comes with old age. The head presents a 'common appeaance', too much stop (2) and a short, blunt muzzle (3 - 4)
STRAIGHT LINE PROFILE (NO 'STOP')
LONG STOP
At first glance this appears to be a good type head, but close inspection reveals total absence of 'stop'. (1-2) The 'stop' on a Collie is slight, but it should be there, nonetheless. The stop on this head is too far down the muzzle (dotted line 2). Correct location of 'stop' should be at solid line (1)
THE BITE
(a) DETAIL DRAWING OF SCISSOR BITE
(
A) CORRECT 'SCISSOR BITE'.tThe upper front incisors slightly overlap the lower front incisors, and the inner surface of the upper incisors touch the outer surface of the lower incisors.
a
A
(B) EVEN BITE (Incorrect)
In this bite the upper and lower incisors fit evenly one atop the other. This type of bite causes the incisors to wear down. In older dogs they may be clear to the gum.
B
(C) UNDERSHOT BITE (Incorrect)
In this bite the lower front incisors project beyond the upper front incisors. Also, note that the alignment of all of the teeth may be affected. In counting the teeth in this diagram you might feel that one tooth is missing in the lower jaw - however, in the specimen used for the model in this drawing all teeth were present, but the teeth are so out of line that the first molar is hidden from view by the upper canine tooth.
Bite most often found in connection with 'Roman' head or 'roman' nose.
C
(D) OVERSHOT BITE (Incorrect)
In this bite the upper front incisors project beyond the lower front incisors. The rest of the teeth may also be affected but usually not to the extent that they are in the 'undershot' mouth.tThis type of bite is often, but not always, found in a head where the foreface is long in proportion to the rest of the head. usually produces a 'chinless' appearance.
D
EYES
Correct Almond Shaped Eyes
Medium size, set somewhat obliquely
Sweet expression, intelligent, alert look when listening
EYE FAULTS
Eyes Too Big
But Almond Shaped
Round Eyes
Wrongly placed
Eye Rounded behind as a drop
Triangular Shaped Eyes
Eyes Too Small
Eyes Too Narrow
Eyes Set Straight
Eyes Set Too Close To each other
EARS
Ears should be small and not too close together nor too much to the side of the skull.
When in repose carried thrown back, but when on the alert brought forward and carried semi-erect
Well Set, Correct Shape & Size
Carried Correctly
EAR FAULTS
Set too Close On Top of Skull
Correct Size & Shape
Set Too far apart On Top Of Skull
Correct size & shape
Ears Too Heavy
Prick Ears
No Break
Ears Too Big
But Correctly Set
Ears Too Light
Not Enough Tip
Home Dog Index Back Top Next